The rank will be opened to women for the very first time.

In a year of real firsts in Saudi Arabia, the kingdom will now start hiring women for ‘soldier’ positions.

Saudi’s Directorate of Public Security will accept females in the military rank posts across several cities, including Riyadh, Madinah, Makkah Qassim and Asir.

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According to the Saudi Press Agency, applicants must be of Saudi origin, and raised in the kingdom—the only exception is if a woman’s father had to live abroad with a government role.

 

Candidates must also be aged between 25 and 35, be above 155 centimetres tall, and have at least a high school diploma.

The role will include responsibilities such as investigating crimes, regulating traffic, issuing driving permits and protecting mosque visitors, Gulf Business reports, and hopefuls can apply online at jobs.moi.gov.sa until March 1.

saudi women

Women who are married to a non-Saudi nationals, however, will be excluded, and all applicants will have to pass interviews and medical and background checks.

The news comes just after Saudi’s Public Prosecution Office revealed it would start recruiting hiring as investigators for the first time ever.

Recent changes in Saudi have come as part of Vision 2030, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s ambitious post-oil economic plan which aims to make Saudi a more modern, tourist-friendly destination.

Last September, a royal decree revealed women will be able to secure driving licences from June 2018, with the news widely celebrated around the globe.

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As part of the initiative, the government also aims to increase the percentage of women in the nation’s workforce from 23 per cent to 28 per cent by 2020.

Additionally, more Saudi females have been appointed to top jobsa royal directive allowed women to use certain government services without a male guardian’s consent, and recent approval was issued for the go-ahead of women’s gyms.